13. Support for Referees (Zero Tolerance Policy)

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It is expected that every person responsible for a team and each and every spectator and player will support the referee. This support is essential to the proper play of the game and to the development of our players. Failure to support the referees, especially by the person (s) responsible for the team, undermines the authority of the referee, sets a bad example for everyone else, especially the players, and can rapidly lead into a hostile, negative game environment which is entirely inconsistent with the sportsmanship goals BAYS is trying to promote. Therefore, the basic rule is that persons responsible for a team and spectators will not address the referee at all during the play of the game. This prohibition, its exceptions, and the penalties for violating it, are described below.

     

  1. Persons Responsible for a Team

    With the exceptions of responding to a communication initiated by the referee, making a substitution, or pointing out an emergency safety issue, during the play of the game the persons responsible for the team should not say anything to the referee, nor should they do anything which in any way conveys any criticism of the referee. Coaches may ask questions before the start of the game. Coaches may not approach the referee at half time or at the end of the game. Coaches who have concerns about a referee’s officiating may express those concerns orally or in writing to the referee assignor and/or the BAYS Referees Representative. They may not express those concerns directly to the referee.

    BAYS recommends that the referee deal with infractions of this rule in the following manner:

    As to the first infraction, the referee should determine if the conduct involves serious misconduct under the ordinary FIFA rules. If it does, a caution (optionally showing a yellow card) or a dismissal (optionally showing a red card) should be awarded, depending on the nature of the conduct. (For example, a threat of bodily harm or an obscenity directed at the referee should result in a dismissal. A prolonged, significant outburst of dissent should result in a caution.)

    On the other hand, the first instance of a short, reasonably low-keyed referee criticism by a person responsible for the team should be ignored. The second instance should result in a warning, the third in a caution, and the fourth in an ejection. In giving the warning, the referee should make clear the next instance of dissent of any sort will result in a caution. Similarly, after a caution, the referee should make clear that the next instance of dissent of any kind will result in an ejection.

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  3. Spectators

    With the exception of responding to a communication initiated by the referee or pointing out an emergency safety issue, spectators should not say anything to the referee, nor should they do anything which in any way conveys any criticism of the referee.

    BAYS recommends that the referee deal with infractions of this rule in the following manner:

    As to the first infraction, the referee should stop the game and ask the person responsible for the team to quiet the offending spectator.

    As to the second infraction, the referee should stop the game and ask the person responsible for the team to warn the spectator that the next infraction will result in the spectator leaving the game; otherwise the referee will abandon the game, and file a report with the club and BAYS. BAYS policy will be to generally impose a forfeit on the team with which the spectator is affiliated, and the referee should so inform the person responsible for that team.

    As to the third infraction, the referee should instruct the person responsible for the team to direct the spectator to leave the field. If the spectator does not leave, the referee should abandon the game, and file his/her report.

    The referee may need the assistance of the responsible persons from both teams if the spectator is not affiliated with either team.